the beard, yes?

“If you love and get hurt, love more.

If you love more and hurt more, love even more.

If you love even more and get hurt even more, love some more until it hurts no more…”
― William Shakespeare

— (via lapitiedangereuse)
psychrophile:

Charlotte Rampling.

psychrophile:

Charlotte Rampling.

(via pickurselfup)

edithshead:

Bill Nighyphotographer unknown

edithshead:

Bill Nighy
photographer unknown

(via bucksthreads)

gentlewave:

Jean Béraud: Parisian Street Scene, ca. 1885, oil on panel, 38.7 x 26.8 cm, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, source: wikimedia.org.

gentlewave:

Jean Béraud: Parisian Street Scene, ca. 1885, oil on panel, 38.7 x 26.8 cm, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, source: wikimedia.org.

jean-seberg:

Jean Seberg on audition, 1956

(via the-dark-city)

Everyone discusses my art and pretends to understand, as if it were necessary to understand, when it is simply necessary to love. — Claude Monet (via post-impressionisms)
gorgonetta:

[Buster Keaton in his undershirt, gazing at a photo of Lon Chaney on top of his makeup kit]

gorgonetta:

[Buster Keaton in his undershirt, gazing at a photo of Lon Chaney on top of his makeup kit]

(via twostriptechnicolor)

mlb:

and a one, and a two and a three

mlb:

and a one, and a two and a three

tl55love:

San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum throws to the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game on Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in San Francisco. Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez, AP

Sanchez lifts Giants over Dodgers 3-2 in 12

thegetty:

A 19th century calling card!
Cheap to produce with popular subject matter, usually performers and celebrities, these cards would be collected and compiled into albums.
Album of French actors, actresses and dancers, 1860s, André Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, photographer; André Giroux, photographer;Pierre-Louis Pierson, photographer; . J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

A 19th century calling card!

Cheap to produce with popular subject matter, usually performers and celebrities, these cards would be collected and compiled into albums.

Album of French actors, actresses and dancers, 1860s, André Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, photographer; André Giroux, photographer;Pierre-Louis Pierson, photographer; . J. Paul Getty Museum.

nprbooks:

Image: Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Paco Junquera/Getty Images)
Today’s top book news item:
Gabriel García Márquez left behind an unpublished manuscript when he died last week at age 87, Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press. Pera added that Marquez’s family has not yet decided whether to publish it.
Meanwhile, the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published an extract of the work, tentatively titled We’ll See Each Other in August (En agosto nos vemos). In the excerpt, a middle-aged woman named Ana Magdalena Bach has a fling during her annual trip to a tropical island to put flowers on her mother’s grave. She stays at a hotel overlooking a lagoon full of herons. Ana, though she’s married, meets a man at the hotel and begins an affair with him. The excerpt has a strong sense of place — García Márquez’s descriptions are lush with flowers and tropical life – and a ripple of eroticism travels through it, from the touch of perfume Ana puts behind her ear at the beginning of the chapter to the thunderstorm during her encounter with the man from the hotel.

nprbooks:

Image: Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Paco Junquera/Getty Images)

Today’s top book news item:

Gabriel García Márquez left behind an unpublished manuscript when he died last week at age 87, Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press. Pera added that Marquez’s family has not yet decided whether to publish it.

Meanwhile, the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published an extract of the work, tentatively titled We’ll See Each Other in August (En agosto nos vemos). In the excerpt, a middle-aged woman named Ana Magdalena Bach has a fling during her annual trip to a tropical island to put flowers on her mother’s grave. She stays at a hotel overlooking a lagoon full of herons. Ana, though she’s married, meets a man at the hotel and begins an affair with him. The excerpt has a strong sense of place — García Márquez’s descriptions are lush with flowers and tropical life – and a ripple of eroticism travels through it, from the touch of perfume Ana puts behind her ear at the beginning of the chapter to the thunderstorm during her encounter with the man from the hotel.

(via npr)